Castles, islands and converted churches: 7 insane properties you could buy for less than the price of a one-bed flat in London

 
Emma Haslett
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According to home.co.uk, the price of the average one-bed flat in London is now £482,000.

But for the price of a cramped, damp basement in London, you could get something altogether more exciting elsewhere in the country. Time to leave the capital? Here's what you could get...

1. St Michael's Church, Scotland, £375,000


(Source: Zoopla)

This four-bedroom family home comes complete with stained-glass windows, 12th century arches - and its own graveyard.

The church was converted into a home in 2007 and is, according to the blurb, within easy commuting distance of both Edinburgh and Glasgow. There's ample off-road parking, all carpets are included in the sale - and the sellers make clear there are no ghosts. Which is a bonus.


(Source: Zoopla)

2. Torfinlay, Strathpeffer, £245,000


(Source: Rightmove)

Alright, so with just two bedrooms, you're not going to get much more space than you would in London - but then again, this little cottage does come with 232 acres of "hill ground and native woodland". So if you're the outdoors type, it's perfect. The only catch is that bidding for the property ends on Tuesday November 18 - so if you fancy a Highland hideaway, get in there fast.

3. Island of Linga, Shetland, £250,000


(Source: Neil Risk)

You could linger for a while on the Island of Linga. Admittedly it's a fixer-upper, but the 64-acre island, in the Vaila Sound, has planning consent to rebuild two cottages, a traditional watermill and a pier, as well as a windmill and solar panels. The place has been uninhabited since 1934, but Neil Risk, the estate agent selling the island, reckons there's an opportunity for a "unique upmarket eco-tourism development". Or you could just run away there. Whatever...


(Source: Neil Risk)

4. Water tank, Kilmarnock, £99,950


(Source: Zoopla)

One for fans of the Teletubbies, or at least their subterranean home. This disused water tank in Kilmarnock comes with planning permission to convert it into a five-bedroom home. Unfortunately, the listing doesn't say whether the two sports cars parked in the driveway are part of the price.

The design possibilities are "infinite", says estate agent eMoov - but here's one configuration:


(Source: Zoopla)

Unfortunately, at the moment the site is still an over-grown watertank. But at the bargain price of just under 100 grand, you should be able to build it and have cash left over for a nice sofa...


(Source: Zoopla)

5. Gothic Lodge House, Clyde Valley, £350,000


(Source: Zoopla)

Right on the banks of the River Clyde, this three-bedroom lodge might look like something out of the Adams Family, but actually it's a surprisingly comfortable family home which dates back to 1861, when it was built as a gate house to Mauldslie Castle.

The house is close to both Lanark and Hamilton, and comes with fishing rights on the river.


(Source: Zoopla)

What does the experienced fisherman do after a hard day's work? Why, relax in their personal sauna, of course:


(Source: Zoopla)

6. Castle-let, Worcestershire, £268,000


(Source: Zoopla)

They say an Englishman's home is his castle, but that's literally true in the case of this grade II listed folly. Built in 1842 by Lord Mountnorris, the two-bedroom, two-storey home comes with its own tower - useful for those "Rapunzel moments".


(Source: Zoopla)

The castle also includes a very charming-looking roof terrace.


(Source: Zoopla)

7. Kilmartin Castle, Argyll, £375,000


(Source: Knight Frank)

Back to Scotland to visit the three-bedroom Kilmartin Castle, the semi-fortified late 16th century residence of John Carswell, the rector of Kilmartin who later became Bishop of The Isles and, according to agent Knight Frank, was "famed for translating Knox's liturgy into Gaelic - the first printed book in that language". It comes complete with vaulted passages:


(Source: Knight Frank)

Although with low ceilings in some rooms, the castle may not be suitable for the very tall...


(Source: Knight Frank)

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