Battersea Power Station’s “Flower” building, Electric Boulevard and Battersea Roof Gardens designed by Frank Gehry and Norman Foster will join the London skyline by 2020

 
Lynsey Barber
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Battersea Powers Station's third phase gets the go ahead (Source: Battersea Power Station Development Company)

The third phase of development at Battersea Power Station has been given the go ahead by Wandsworth council, including a thumbs up to two new stunning buildings designed by famous architechts Frank Gehry and Norman Foster.

Phase three of the scheme to regenerate the area around the power station includes the creation of a pedestrian high street called Electric Boulevard stretching from Battersea Park Road to the famous power station, entrances to the extended Northern Line and 1,305 new homes.

Wandsworth council gave approval to detailed plans of the development last night and it is due to be completed by 2020.

The council’s planning committee chair, councillor Sarah McDermot said: "Both the Gehry and Fosters designs are outstanding. The architecture itself will be great attraction and the new public parks and shopping areas are of the very highest quality.

Gehry’s “Flower” building will be located to the east of Electric Boulevard along with four other buildings designed by the man who created New York’s Guggenheim museum.

The buildings, ranging from 16 to 17 storeys high, will include 688 of the new homes, a gym, shops, cafes bars and restaurants.

(Source: Battersea Power Station Development Company)

The Norman Foster designed building, 17 storeys high, will sit west of Electric Boulevard and will have one of London’s largest roof terraces. It will be home to 617 of the new homes, shops, cafes, bars, restaurants and other amenities as well as a 167 room hotel and health clinic.

(Source: Battersea Power Station Development Company)

The Malaysian owners of the development, the Battersea Power Station Development Company, have already begun work on the first two phases of the project which includes dismantling and rebuilding of the iconic power station chimneys.

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