UN climate change summit: Cameron to focus on shale gas extraction

 
Sarah Spickernell
Follow Sarah
Some environmentalists are vehemently opposed to fracking (Source: Getty)
Today, world leaders including Prime Minister David Cameron have gathered in New York for the UN climate change summit.
UN leader Ban Ki-moon, who is hosting the event, said the talks are ‘not to talk, but to make history’. He has asked more than 100 global leaders to make pledges for cutting greenhouse gas emissions – one of the biggest contributing factors to climate change.
French President Francois Hollande has already promised to donate $1bn to the Green Climate Fund, saying Paris can be a symbol of “change for climate”.
Each leader will have four minutes to give their address and outline their vision for tackling the steadily increasing levels of greenhouse gases being emitted and contributing to climate change.
Cameron is expected to use his time to stress the importance of using shale gas, and that it should not be restricted by “green tape”.
While some people are strongly opposed to the use of shale gas, arguing that fracking – the technique used to extract it – is bad for the environment, the government says it can play an important role in tackling the issue cost-effectively.
Cameron is also expected to say that countries should be allowed to choose their own paths to going green and should not be required to use specific technologies such as renewable energy.
Who emits the most carbon dioxide?
The latest data on carbon dioxide emissions was collected by EDGAR in 2012. It shows that China was by far the biggest contributor to the polluting effect by releasing 9.8m tonnes of the gas, followed by the US which released 5.19m tonnes. The UK came in equal ninth place with Mexico by releasing 0.49m tonnes.

Related articles